The Perfect Poker Hand

08:08 Nov 28

Today we look at one of the most interesting poker hands ever broadcast on High Stakes Poker between Barry Greenstein, Peter Eastgate and Tom Dwan. For more expert hand analysis check out PokerStrategy.com’s video section.

Greenstein raises from UTG and since he is a classic TAG at a table full of crazy action junkies, his range will be very tight. His continuation bet in a multi-way pot further strengthens this assumption as a tight player normally doesn’t try and bluff two players.

Dwan realises that it is rather unlikely that Greenstein flopped the full house with TT because Dwan himself has the T in his hand while another T is on the board. So he makes a flop raise trying to represent a very strong hand and apply pressure on Greenstein. The very deep stacks play in Dwan's favour here.

Eastgate will have called pre-flop with nearly any two cards in the blinds due to the great pot odds he's getting. By cold calling the flop raise he signals he has a 2.

Dwan takes advantage of the fact that Eastgate knows that Dwan will put him on a very narrow range.

"I know you have it but I'm still going to bet" is what Dwan's action communicates on the turn.

Both Eastgate and Greenstein are too intimidated to call down with their bluff catchers and Dwan wins the hand without a showdown.

 

Dwan's perfect assessment

 

The situation is always easier to assess from our position as observers. Even if the hand can be logically explained afterwards, it is a completely different thing to actually play like this at the table. Especially when there is big money on the line and cameras recording our every move.

Most players, even very good ones, probably wouldn't even have recognised the possibility of bluffing Greenstein. They would have played "call flop, call club or ten on the turn, otherwise fold". And almost nobody would have been courageous enough to think about continuing the bluff after Eastgate's cold call on the flop.

This is why Gabe Kaplan was right to say that Dwan had "the weakest hand, but the biggest heart".

Article by Macropoker

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